Trying to Buy A “Diamond In the Rough?

The paper said “diamond in the rough.” Which means either it needs lots of work or perhaps just a little TLC. But exactly how “rough” can a house be before a lender decides the collateral is not healthy enough to issue a mortgage? And what happens if you want the seller to fix something before you’ll close the deal?

Upon contract, one of the first things you’ll want to do is have the home inspected for structural integrity, defects and potential problems. Note, this is not the function of a licensed appraiser who determines the market value for the home. A home inspection helps to ascertain the overall “health” of the house you’re about to buy. A bad roof, leaky plumbing or wood rot can usually only be found when a house doctor crawls through the attic, under the house and on the roof. If there are major problems found, potentially it can stop the deal dead in its tracks. That’s why most lenders won’t order appraisals on properties until an inspection has been performed.

 

Written By: David Reed. If you would like to continue reading, click here.

The Appraisal Contingency

The appraisal of a property’s value has become a regularly used residual service by homebuyers in the real estate process. However, it can become a tool that is tossed by the wayside in a hot market — and that’s not very wise when it comes to the largest investment most consumers will ever make.

The appraisal serves various purposes in a transaction for several people. It acts as a financial compass, as it were, for everyone that has a monetary stake in the property value — the seller, the buyer, the lender, and the insurance company.

 

Written By: M. Anthony Carr. If you would like to continue reading, click here.