What You Should Look for When House Hunting

If you’re shopping for a home and can afford to buy one, you couldn’t be in a better position right now. In many parts of the country, housing inventory is high and both home prices and interest rates are low and as a buyer, you can take advantage of that.

With so many properties on the market, you can probably take a more leisurely approach to house hunting without getting into a fast-paced bidding war. There is a caveat, however. The best homes priced properly for the market conditions will always be in higher demand.

As you begin your search for the right home for you, it pays to keep in mind things you need to check carefully so that they don’t cost you big bucks in the long run.

 

Written By: Diana Lundin. If you would like to continue reading, click here.

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Trying to Buy A “Diamond In the Rough?

The paper said “diamond in the rough.” Which means either it needs lots of work or perhaps just a little TLC. But exactly how “rough” can a house be before a lender decides the collateral is not healthy enough to issue a mortgage? And what happens if you want the seller to fix something before you’ll close the deal?

Upon contract, one of the first things you’ll want to do is have the home inspected for structural integrity, defects and potential problems. Note, this is not the function of a licensed appraiser who determines the market value for the home. A home inspection helps to ascertain the overall “health” of the house you’re about to buy. A bad roof, leaky plumbing or wood rot can usually only be found when a house doctor crawls through the attic, under the house and on the roof. If there are major problems found, potentially it can stop the deal dead in its tracks. That’s why most lenders won’t order appraisals on properties until an inspection has been performed.

 

Written By: David Reed. If you would like to continue reading, click here.

Title Insurance: Who Needs It?

During the real estate transaction (especially if you’re a first-time buyer), you’re hit with so many foreign terms, fees and requirements your head spins. One of those strange and unfamiliar costs is title insurance. In most cases, borrowers have no option—either you get title insurance (among other requirements) or you don’t get a loan.

The lender says you need it, you want the loan to go though, so you buy title insurance. Great. So what is title insurance?

When you buy a home you want to make sure that the people selling it actually have full and legal title. The party who conducts closing will check this out by going down to the local property records office to research the history of ownership.

 

Written By: Courtney Ronan. If you would like to continue reading, click here.

Title Insurance

Did you know that Abraham Lincoln lost his house twice because of cloudy title? It’s true. First American Corporation, which is one of the country’s largest title insurance underwriters, reports about the losses on its website and in a promotional brochure about the dangers of not having a clear title to land.

When it comes time to finish the paperwork for your first piece of real estate (investment or otherwise) you’re going to find out that many trees have lost their lives because of the paper shuffled back and forth to buy, sell, rent, insure, list, survey and record real estate.

 

Written By: M. Anthony Carr. If you would like to continue reading, click here.

The Appraisal Contingency

The appraisal of a property’s value has become a regularly used residual service by homebuyers in the real estate process. However, it can become a tool that is tossed by the wayside in a hot market — and that’s not very wise when it comes to the largest investment most consumers will ever make.

The appraisal serves various purposes in a transaction for several people. It acts as a financial compass, as it were, for everyone that has a monetary stake in the property value — the seller, the buyer, the lender, and the insurance company.

 

Written By: M. Anthony Carr. If you would like to continue reading, click here.

The Appraisal Contingency

The appraisal of a property’s value has become a regularly used residual service by homebuyers in the real estate process. However, it can become a tool that is tossed by the wayside in a hot market — and that’s not very wise when it comes to the largest investment most consumers will ever make.

The appraisal serves various purposes in a transaction for several people. It acts as a financial compass, as it were, for everyone that has a monetary stake in the property value — the seller, the buyer, the lender, and the insurance company.

 

Written By: M. Anthony Carr. If you would like to continue reading, click here.

Renting to Own

A good option for first-time homebuyers?

When Chris and Sarah Kane of Visalia, Calif. decided to purchase their first house, their hopes of becoming first-time homebuyers were nearly dashed by ever-soaring prices and a down payment out of their reach.

“We found a home we really liked for $221,000 and figured we would just have to rent it,” said Chris Kane. “But as we thought more about it, we knew we didn’t want to spend over $2000 a month on a home with nothing to show for it.”

Instead, they took a different tack with the seller.

 

Written By:Suzanne L. Coates. If you would like to  continue reading, click here.